Nigerian Postgraduate Medical Journal

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 240--246

Determinants of correct knowledge of coronavirus infection and COVID-19 disease pandemic among pregnant women in South-West Nigeria


Rukiyat Adeola Abdus-Salam1, Temitayo Victor Lawal2, Olatunji Okikiola Lawal3, Fatima Motunrayo Akinlusi4, Oluwasomidoyin Olukemi Bello1, Imran Oludare Morhason-Bello1 
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rukiyat Adeola Abdus-Salam
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State
Nigeria

Background: As the spread of COVID-19 continues, the disease and its sequels affect antenatal, intrapartum and post-partum care, thus making pregnant women and their babies vulnerable. This study assessed the knowledge of COVID-19 disease and determinants of correct knowledge among pregnant women at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women. Data collected were analysed with STATA 16.0 software. Descriptive, bivariate and multinomial regression analyses were performed. The primary outcomes were awareness of COVID-19 (yes/no), correct knowledge, and determinants. Results: Three hundred and eighty participants were interviewed. The mean age was 32 years (±4.78). A little over a third (37%) were aged 30-34 years, married (97.1%), Yoruba (86.6%), had tertiary education (89.0), in skilled occupation (54.6%) and not well-exposed to media (56.7%). The knowledge of COVID-19 was good (15%), fair (79%), and poor (6%). About 19.6%, 66.7% and 13.7% of participants who had poor, fair and good knowledge, respectively, believed that COVID-19 exists (P = 0.007). The factors associated with good knowledge include occupation, income, level of education and exposure to media (P value <0.05). On multinomial logistic regression, occupation was significantly associated with good knowledge, while being less exposed to media was significantly associated with having poor knowledge. Conclusion: Pregnant women had fair knowledge of COVID-19 disease; occupation, level of education, exposure to media and income are associated with having correct knowledge. Misinformation and misconception about COVID-19 disease may affect maternal health utilization and pregnancy outcomes. Antenatal care presents an opportunity to provide health education and increase the knowledge of COVID-19 among pregnant women.


How to cite this article:
Abdus-Salam RA, Lawal TV, Lawal OO, Akinlusi FM, Bello OO, Morhason-Bello IO. Determinants of correct knowledge of coronavirus infection and COVID-19 disease pandemic among pregnant women in South-West Nigeria.Niger Postgrad Med J 2021;28:240-246


How to cite this URL:
Abdus-Salam RA, Lawal TV, Lawal OO, Akinlusi FM, Bello OO, Morhason-Bello IO. Determinants of correct knowledge of coronavirus infection and COVID-19 disease pandemic among pregnant women in South-West Nigeria. Niger Postgrad Med J [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 27 ];28:240-246
Available from: https://www.npmj.org/article.asp?issn=1117-1936;year=2021;volume=28;issue=4;spage=240;epage=246;aulast=Abdus-Salam;type=0