Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 84
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 325-333

Predictors and causes of in-hospital maternal deaths within 120 h of admission at a tertiary hospital in South-Western, Nigeria: A retrospective cohort study


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Joseph Ayodeji Olamijulo
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/npmj.npmj_180_22

Rights and Permissions

Background: An efficient, comprehensive emergency obstetrics care (CEMOC) can considerably reduce the burden of maternal mortality (MM) in Nigeria. Information about the risk of maternal death within 120 h of admission can reflect the quality of CEMOC offered. Aim: This study aims to determine the predictors and causes of maternal death within 120 h of admission at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, LUTH, Lagos South-Western, Nigeria. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study amongst consecutive maternal deaths at a hospital in South-Western Nigeria, from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2017, using data from patients' medical records. We compared participants that died within 120 h to participants that survived beyond 120 h. Survival life table analysis, Kaplan–Meier plots and multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression were conducted to evaluate the factors affecting survival within 120 h of admission. Stata version 16 statistical software (StatCorp USA) was used for analysis. Results: Of the 430 maternal deaths, 326 had complete records. The mean age of the deceased was 30.7± (5.9) years and median time to death was 24 (5–96) h. Two hundred and sixty-eight (82.2%) women out of 326 died within 120 h of admission. Almost all maternal deaths from uterine rupture (95.2%) and most deaths from obstetric haemorrhage (87.3%), induced miscarriage (88.9%), sepsis (82.9%) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (77.9%) occurred within 120 h of admission. Admission to the intensive care unit (P = 0.007), cadre of admitting doctor (P < 0.001), cause of death (P = 0.036) and mode of delivery (P = 0.012) were independent predictors of hazard of death within 120 h. Conclusion: The majority (82.2%) of maternal deaths occurred within 120 h of admission. Investment in the prevention and acute management of uterine rupture, obstetric haemorrhage, sepsis and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy can help to reduce MM within 120 h in our environment.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed456    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded73    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal