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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 296-302

Willingness to pay for a COVID-19 vaccine for oneself and one's child among individuals attending a tertiary care centre in West Bengal, India


1 Indian Council of Medical Research-Regional Medical Research Centre, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ENT), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Farhad Ahamed
Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/npmj.npmj_194_22

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Background: The free-of-cost supply could not meet the demand for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccines in India, so the government approved an injection option with a price. We aimed to determine how much money an individual would be willing to pay for a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves and their children and assess the factors determining it. Methods: We conducted a study among all adults visiting the outpatient department of a government tertiary care hospital in West Bengal, India, in August 2021. Trained nursing officers combined bidding game and open-ended question methods during personal interviews to estimate the willingness-to-pay (WTP) values. Results: The mean (standard deviation) age of 1565 participants was 40.8 (12.2) years with 46.5% (n = 727) males, 70.4% (n = 1102) parents, 50.0% (n = 783) educated upto class 12 and 30.9% (n = 483) belonging to upper-middle socio-economic scale (SES). The median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) WTP amount for the first dose and the subsequent/booster dose among the unvaccinated (50.2%, n = 785) and vaccinated (49.8%, n = 780) participants were ₹0 (0–100) and ₹0 (0–200), respectively. The median (IQR) WTP for inoculating children with any COVID-19 vaccine was ₹50 (0–300) in both groups. Significant differences were found in the WTP prices for adult vaccines in both groups concerning age category (P = 0.02), education (P < 0.01) and SES (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Although more than half of the respondents were unwilling to pay for themselves, WTP for COVID-19 vaccination was higher for their children. Policy-makers should consider income, education and age to cap the private sector vaccination price.


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